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Two-day organic agriculture workshop in Athens April 22-23

The University of Georgia’s organic agriculture faculty members are hosting a two-day crash course in organic certification and sustainable growing practices April 22-23 in Athens, Georgia.  The event is geared toward beginning or established farmers who are pondering organic certification.  Business planning, marketing and certification process details will be covered in this short course, which will also include hands-on organic insect and disease management sessions.   More Georgia farmers are seeking organic certification for both ecological and business reasons, said workshop organizer and UGA Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist George Boyhan. Consumers are willing to pay more for organic-certified vegetables and fruits, which translates into higher profits for farmers.   “Organic production has seen tenfold increase in production in Georgia over the past 10 years,” Boyhan said. “There continues to be unmet demand for organically produced vegetables. This course will focus on how to grow organically, but also how to grow an organic vegetable business.”   Sections of the course will be taught by Boyhan, UGA Extension disease management specialist Elizabeth Little, UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) integrated pest management researcher Paul Guillebeau, CAES horticulturist Cecilia McGregor, and Vanessa Shonkwiler, a business development specialist with the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development.    Registration for the two-day event is $150 and includes all study materials, meals and snacks. The course will be held at the greenhouses on South Milledge Avenue near UGA’s student-run farm, UGArden. The deadline for registration is April 10.  To register, contact Boyhan at 706-231-4137 or <span id=This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.." title="The University of Georgia’s organic agriculture faculty members are hosting a two-day crash course in organic certification and sustainable growing practices April 22-23 in Athens, Georgia. The event is geared toward beginning or established farmers who are pondering organic certification. Business planning, marketing and certification process details will be covered in this short course, which will also include hands-on organic insect and disease management sessions. More Georgia farmers are seeking organic certification for both ecological and business reasons, said workshop organizer and UGA Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist George Boyhan. Consumers are willing to pay more for organic-certified vegetables and fruits, which translates into higher profits for farmers. “Organic production has seen tenfold increase in production in Georgia over the past 10 years,” Boyhan said. “There continues to be unmet demand for organically produced vegetables. This course will focus on how to grow organically, but also how to grow an organic vegetable business.” Sections of the course will be taught by Boyhan, UGA Extension disease management specialist Elizabeth Little, UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) integrated pest management researcher Paul Guillebeau, CAES horticulturist Cecilia McGregor, and Vanessa Shonkwiler, a business development specialist with the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development. Registration for the two-day event is $150 and includes all study materials, meals and snacks. The course will be held at the greenhouses on South Milledge Avenue near UGA’s student-run farm, UGArden. The deadline for registration is April 10. To register, contact Boyhan at 706-231-4137 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.." align="right" />The University of Georgia’s organic agriculture faculty members are hosting a two-day crash course in organic certification and sustainable growing practices April 22-23 in Athens, Georgia.

The event is geared toward beginning or established farmers who are pondering organic certification.

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Georgia Property Rights Under Attack as Promised Eminent Domain Bill Stalls

Georgia’s Senate Bill 191, addressing concerns regarding the construction of petroleum pipelines, on Thursday passed out of the House Energy, Utilities and Telecommunications Committee after having passed the Senate. It now awaits a floor vote by the full House. SB 191 puts in place additional permitting measures and more closely regulates private companies’ use of eminent domain for the construction of petroleum pipelines in Georgia.

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Shaw Leader Named to Energy Manager Today 50

– Charles Chapman, director of energy and reliability engineering at leading flooring manufacturer Shaw Industries Group, Inc. (Shaw) Distinction recognizes those who drive their companies and the energy management industry forward

Charles Chapman, director of energy and reliability engineering at leading flooring manufacturer Shaw Industries Group, Inc. (Shaw), has been named to the 2017 Energy Manager Today 50. Awarded by Energy Manager Today magazine, the distinction recognizes those who have driven their companies and the energy management industry forward.

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Georgia Property Rights Under Attack as Promised Eminent Domain Bill Stalls

Georgia’s Senate Bill 191, addressing concerns regarding the construction of petroleum pipelines, on Thursday passed out of the House Energy, Utilities and Telecommunications Committee after having passed the Senate. It now awaits a floor vote by the full House. SB 191 puts in place additional permitting measures and more closely regulates private companies’ use of eminent domain for the construction of petroleum pipelines in Georgia.

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Court Reverses Ruling in Appeal of Pulp Mill Pollution Permit

Rayonier AM to Continue Polluting Altamaha River

A Georgia superior court has ruled that a pulp mill’s visible, foul-smelling pollution of the Altamaha River in southeast Georgia can continue.

Representing Altamaha Riverkeeper, GreenLaw, Stack & Associates and the Southern Environmental Law Center successfully challenged Rayonier Advanced Materials’ pollution discharge permit in state administrative court. The groups charge that the limits on odor and color in the permit granted by the Georgia Environmental Protections Division (EPD) do not go far enough to uphold state water quality standards, particularly in low flow conditions.

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Toshiba-Westinghouse Financial Crisis Casualty: Southern Company’s Georgia Power suspends pursuit of new nuclear reactors in Stewart County Georgia

In the wake of Toshiba’s financial meltdown, Georgia Power discussed at a hearing before the Georgia Public Service Commission (PSC) the utility’s decision to suspend activities associated with pursuing new nuclear reactors in Stewart County, Georgia along the Chattahoochee River. Georgia Power summarized the decision in a document filed late Tuesday with the Commission. The Japanese tech-mogul Toshiba, which owns Westinghouse and is the designer and builder of the AP1000 nuclear reactor design, announced last month that it was exiting the nuclear construction business due to the massive financial losses suffered because of the much-delayed and over-budget reactors under construction at Southern Company’s Plant Vogtle in Georgia and SCANA’s V.C. Summer nuclear plant in South Carolina.

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