This book is a must read! It is full of useful information that I have not seen elsewhere. Don't let the faith aspect scare you away. There is so much good information in this that you won't want to put it down.Good Food is a must read! It is full of useful information that I have not seen elsewhere. Don't let the faith aspect scare you away. There is so much good information in this that you won't want to put it down. - Beth Bond (read fuller review by Beth)

Christians in the United States are on a quest for good food. And yet at every turn, they confront brokenness in the food system. Access to healthy food is not secure. Farmers and laborers struggle to find meaningful agricultural work that pays a livable wage. Animals and the land are abused. At the public policy level, legislation has increasingly favored mass-produced products in order to provide the largest amount of food to the greatest number of people at the lowest possible prices-- regardless of the consequences. Unable to trace the sources of their food, and perhaps even the ingredients, consumers are vulnerable to a deep and abiding alienation. Still, many religions, including the Christian tradition, orient themselves around the table, a site for connection and nourishment.



Good Food is a practical theology grounded in a rich ethnographic study of the food practices of diverse faith communities and populations. In the midst of the food system's woundedness and harm, they are hopeful but not naïve, and in their imaginative work, the seeds for a thriving food system are taking root. Grounded in unflinching analysis and encompassing both theological and moral implications, Ayres examines actual religious practices of food justice, discovering in the process a grounded theology for food. Ayres challenges people of faith to participate in communal initiatives that will make a real difference--to support local farmers, grow their own food, and advocate for fair food policies. Good Food equips readers with the theological and practical tools needed to safeguard that which sustains us: food.

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Review by Beth Bond

Loved this book and although this book is listed as a religious book, it felt more as a sustainability book on the conflict of taking back our food system. Don't get me wrong there are plenty of case studies of people of faith doing great work to do their part in the great food revolution we are experiencing. However, it never takes over the prevailing conversation of food justice, the big ag/political influence on the global marketplace, and how people all over the world, most particularly in North America, are doing their small part to change the food landscape.

I am belaboring the fact that this is not overly religious because this book has so much to offer the general food discussion. I would dislike the secular community to pass this book up because of the department this might be found in the bookstore.

This book is a wealth of information. For those readers, who have read The Omnivore's Dilemma, you will find the developments presented in this book a great addition (and some discouraging) to the premises laid out by Michael Pollan. I found myself wanting to underline many points so I could go back and tweet but I borrowed book. So I will have to get my own to mark-up. Yes, it's that good! Get your own copy to share with others.